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 Regionals Location

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Coachmac



Posts : 250
Join date : 2009-11-24
Location : Moncton, NB

PostSubject: Regionals Location   Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:31 pm

Does anyone know the dates? They aren't listed on the NBIAA website.
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thehump



Posts : 7
Join date : 2010-09-21

PostSubject: Re: Regionals Location   Tue Sep 21, 2010 9:21 pm

Final 8 is Feb 26 in Saint John
Senior Sectionals are Feb 18-19
Senior Regionals are Feb 11-12
For both AA and AAA,
- Boys are in the South and North
- Girls are in the West and East.

Junior Championships are Feb 11-12
Junior Regionals are Feb 4-5
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Slam Dunk



Posts : 29
Join date : 2010-01-19

PostSubject: Re: Regionals Location   Wed Sep 22, 2010 6:28 am

Coachmac wrote:
Does anyone know the dates? They aren't listed on the NBIAA website.

Click on the NBIAA calendar and you will get all the relevant dates for all sports.
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obcnamtaf



Posts : 191
Join date : 2009-11-17

PostSubject: Re: Regionals Location   Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:24 am

Can you imagine if the NBIAA adopted these rules.....hahaha

NBA referees will have more reasons to issue technical fouls next season.
At the referees' annual meeting in Jersey City, N.J., on Thursday, the league announced the guidelines for technical fouls will expand to include "overt" player reactions to referee calls.
Referees have been instructed to call a technical for:
• Players making aggressive gestures, such as air punches, anywhere on the court.
• Demonstrative disagreement, such as when a player incredulously raises his hands, or smacks his own arm to demonstrate how he was fouled.
• Running directly at an official to complain about a call.
• Excessive inquiries about a call, even in a civilized tone.
In addition, referees have been instructed to consider calling technicals on players who use body language to question or demonstrate displeasure, or say things like, "Come on!" They can also consider technicals for players who "take the long path to the official", walking across the court to make their case.
For the 2005-06 season, the NBA announced a similar crackdown, but the effect was short-lived. Officials say this time they expect the new policies to stick.
Ron Johnson, the NBA's senior vice president of referee operations, said audience research was a major factor behind the most recent change.
"Our players are more personally connected to fans than any other sports," Johnson said. "We don't have masks. ... There's nothing you can hide on the expression of an NBA players. ... People expect hockey players to be fighting. They expect baseball managers to be kicking dirt on umpires. But that's not our game. That's not what our fans want. They tell us in many many ways and I think we have to adjust to meet the needs of our league and our fans. It's a business."
Some reactions will not be penalized, Johnson said. "Heat of the moment" reactions, like a defensive player briefly raising his hands to show he had proper position, will be acceptable.
Johnson also said players showing frustration with themselves will not be penalized, and players will still be able to discuss the game with the referees.
"We want referees and players to talk to understand each other," Johnson said. "If it's infrequent and not distracting, that's fine."
NBA coaches were informed of the changes last week. Beginning Sept. 29th, the league will make presentations on the new rules to the players in all NBA cities.
"We don't want our players looking like they're complaining about calls on the court because it makes them look like complainers," Johnson said. "You do that six times in a game, it really starts to look bad on television. A lot of these things may not look as bad in the arena. But on TV, when attention is focused on it, it stands out."

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f4xi



Posts : 26
Join date : 2010-01-17

PostSubject: Re: Regionals Location   Fri Sep 24, 2010 11:41 am

obcnamtaf wrote:
Can you imagine if the NBIAA adopted these rules.....hahaha

NBA referees will have more reasons to issue technical fouls next season.
At the referees' annual meeting in Jersey City, N.J., on Thursday, the league announced the guidelines for technical fouls will expand to include "overt" player reactions to referee calls.
Referees have been instructed to call a technical for:
• Players making aggressive gestures, such as air punches, anywhere on the court.
• Demonstrative disagreement, such as when a player incredulously raises his hands, or smacks his own arm to demonstrate how he was fouled.
• Running directly at an official to complain about a call.
• Excessive inquiries about a call, even in a civilized tone.
In addition, referees have been instructed to consider calling technicals on players who use body language to question or demonstrate displeasure, or say things like, "Come on!" They can also consider technicals for players who "take the long path to the official", walking across the court to make their case.
For the 2005-06 season, the NBA announced a similar crackdown, but the effect was short-lived. Officials say this time they expect the new policies to stick.
Ron Johnson, the NBA's senior vice president of referee operations, said audience research was a major factor behind the most recent change.
"Our players are more personally connected to fans than any other sports," Johnson said. "We don't have masks. ... There's nothing you can hide on the expression of an NBA players. ... People expect hockey players to be fighting. They expect baseball managers to be kicking dirt on umpires. But that's not our game. That's not what our fans want. They tell us in many many ways and I think we have to adjust to meet the needs of our league and our fans. It's a business."
Some reactions will not be penalized, Johnson said. "Heat of the moment" reactions, like a defensive player briefly raising his hands to show he had proper position, will be acceptable.
Johnson also said players showing frustration with themselves will not be penalized, and players will still be able to discuss the game with the referees.
"We want referees and players to talk to understand each other," Johnson said. "If it's infrequent and not distracting, that's fine."
NBA coaches were informed of the changes last week. Beginning Sept. 29th, the league will make presentations on the new rules to the players in all NBA cities.
"We don't want our players looking like they're complaining about calls on the court because it makes them look like complainers," Johnson said. "You do that six times in a game, it really starts to look bad on television. A lot of these things may not look as bad in the arena. But on TV, when attention is focused on it, it stands out."


Im pretty sure the officials in Saint John have been following these rules for years.
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Coachmac



Posts : 250
Join date : 2009-11-24
Location : Moncton, NB

PostSubject: Re: Regionals Location   Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:10 pm

I love these rules, for the most part. Unfortunately, they will last a couple weeks and then go back to ignoring them.

obcnamtaf wrote:
Can you imagine if the NBIAA adopted these rules.....hahaha

NBA referees will have more reasons to issue technical fouls next season.
At the referees' annual meeting in Jersey City, N.J., on Thursday, the league announced the guidelines for technical fouls will expand to include "overt" player reactions to referee calls.
Referees have been instructed to call a technical for:
• Players making aggressive gestures, such as air punches, anywhere on the court.
• Demonstrative disagreement, such as when a player incredulously raises his hands, or smacks his own arm to demonstrate how he was fouled.
• Running directly at an official to complain about a call.
• Excessive inquiries about a call, even in a civilized tone.
In addition, referees have been instructed to consider calling technicals on players who use body language to question or demonstrate displeasure, or say things like, "Come on!" They can also consider technicals for players who "take the long path to the official", walking across the court to make their case.
For the 2005-06 season, the NBA announced a similar crackdown, but the effect was short-lived. Officials say this time they expect the new policies to stick.
Ron Johnson, the NBA's senior vice president of referee operations, said audience research was a major factor behind the most recent change.
"Our players are more personally connected to fans than any other sports," Johnson said. "We don't have masks. ... There's nothing you can hide on the expression of an NBA players. ... People expect hockey players to be fighting. They expect baseball managers to be kicking dirt on umpires. But that's not our game. That's not what our fans want. They tell us in many many ways and I think we have to adjust to meet the needs of our league and our fans. It's a business."
Some reactions will not be penalized, Johnson said. "Heat of the moment" reactions, like a defensive player briefly raising his hands to show he had proper position, will be acceptable.
Johnson also said players showing frustration with themselves will not be penalized, and players will still be able to discuss the game with the referees.
"We want referees and players to talk to understand each other," Johnson said. "If it's infrequent and not distracting, that's fine."
NBA coaches were informed of the changes last week. Beginning Sept. 29th, the league will make presentations on the new rules to the players in all NBA cities.
"We don't want our players looking like they're complaining about calls on the court because it makes them look like complainers," Johnson said. "You do that six times in a game, it really starts to look bad on television. A lot of these things may not look as bad in the arena. But on TV, when attention is focused on it, it stands out."

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CharlotteCountyBall



Posts : 41
Join date : 2010-09-19

PostSubject: Re: Regionals Location   Tue Sep 28, 2010 2:29 pm

f4xi wrote:
obcnamtaf wrote:
Can you imagine if the NBIAA adopted these rules.....hahaha

NBA referees will have more reasons to issue technical fouls next season.
At the referees' annual meeting in Jersey City, N.J., on Thursday, the league announced the guidelines for technical fouls will expand to include "overt" player reactions to referee calls.
Referees have been instructed to call a technical for:
• Players making aggressive gestures, such as air punches, anywhere on the court.
• Demonstrative disagreement, such as when a player incredulously raises his hands, or smacks his own arm to demonstrate how he was fouled.
• Running directly at an official to complain about a call.
• Excessive inquiries about a call, even in a civilized tone.
In addition, referees have been instructed to consider calling technicals on players who use body language to question or demonstrate displeasure, or say things like, "Come on!" They can also consider technicals for players who "take the long path to the official", walking across the court to make their case.
For the 2005-06 season, the NBA announced a similar crackdown, but the effect was short-lived. Officials say this time they expect the new policies to stick.
Ron Johnson, the NBA's senior vice president of referee operations, said audience research was a major factor behind the most recent change.
"Our players are more personally connected to fans than any other sports," Johnson said. "We don't have masks. ... There's nothing you can hide on the expression of an NBA players. ... People expect hockey players to be fighting. They expect baseball managers to be kicking dirt on umpires. But that's not our game. That's not what our fans want. They tell us in many many ways and I think we have to adjust to meet the needs of our league and our fans. It's a business."
Some reactions will not be penalized, Johnson said. "Heat of the moment" reactions, like a defensive player briefly raising his hands to show he had proper position, will be acceptable.
Johnson also said players showing frustration with themselves will not be penalized, and players will still be able to discuss the game with the referees.
"We want referees and players to talk to understand each other," Johnson said. "If it's infrequent and not distracting, that's fine."
NBA coaches were informed of the changes last week. Beginning Sept. 29th, the league will make presentations on the new rules to the players in all NBA cities.
"We don't want our players looking like they're complaining about calls on the court because it makes them look like complainers," Johnson said. "You do that six times in a game, it really starts to look bad on television. A lot of these things may not look as bad in the arena. But on TV, when attention is focused on it, it stands out."


Im pretty sure the officials in Saint John have been following these rules for years.

Im pretty sure the city of Saint John's high schools have the worst attitude and sportsmanship ive seen in the province.
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